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First WaveRoller power plant nears completion

 

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2011-10-20
First WaveRoller power plant nears completion

 

Testing under way on AW-Energy’s first 3 x 100 kW WaveRoller power plant at the manufacturer’s facility in Kotka, Finland. Photo courtesy of AW-Energy.

The final testing and assembly of AW-Energy’s first 3 x 100 kW WaveRoller power plant is progressing well, and the company is confident that shipping will take place by the end of December. Deployment is scheduled to take place in the waters off Peniche in Portugal as soon as weather conditions permit.

On-shore infrastructure for the plant has been built on land leased from the local municipal authorities there in preparation for the start-up.

The plant’s Power Take Off (PTO) system scored well in its final bench test, which took place over a period of six weeks and covered a number of different wave states, with output capacity proving far higher than expected.

The positive results of the test have attracted the interest of several utilities, including previous collaborators and new potential partners, says AW-Energy. WaveRoller technology is being studied as a possibility for a French project being developed by Finnish utility Fortum and French-based advanced technology group, DCNS, for example.

Fortum and DCNS signed a letter of intent on wave power research and development in France earlier this month and are planning a joint feasibility study for a wave power demonstration project in France.

AW-Energy’s WaveRoller technology exploits surge phenomenon, a strong, ubiquitous, and consistent natural phenomenon present in the world’s oceans. The back and forth movement of the tidal surge moves the plates in a WaveRoller, transferring the kinetic energy produced to a piston pump. The potential energy generated is then captured and converted into electricity.

For more on AW-Energy, see our article or the company’s Web site.

For more on Fortum, see our article or check out their Web site.