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Use of NBS in clinical practice spreading

 

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2010-06-21
Use of NBS in clinical practice spreading

Neurosurgeons and neurologists at five sites in Europe are now using Nexstim’s Navigated Brian Stimulation (NBS) System as part of their clinical workflow for the pre-surgical assessment of the cortex prior to brain tumour or epilepsy surgery.

Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) guided by standard MR-image data, the Nexstim NBS System is the first and only direct, non-invasive, cortical mapping technique cleared by regulatory authorities on both sides of the Atlantic.

Two of the European hospitals involved – Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt – are using NBS for mapping patients’ condition; while Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Sweden and Helsinki University Hospital and Kuopio University Hospital in Finland are using NBS to plan tumour and epilepsy surgery.

A clinical study entitled ‘White matter tractography based on Navigated Brain Stimulation results in Brainlab iPlan’ was published by neurosurgeons at Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin in May. In addition to using the NBS System to map the critical motor areas in the cortex around a tumour, the resulting mapping data was DICOM-exported to a standard Brainlab iPlan planning station, where the results were used to select the seed areas for white matter tractography.

"NBS has the potential to add significant new functionality to the Brainlab iPlan system for planning surgical trajectories that can help preserve critical subcortical motor pathways, as well as cortical motor areas, during tumour resection,” according to neurosurgeons Prof. Dr. P. Vajkoczy and Dr. Th. Picht.

For more about Nexstim’s technology, see our latest article or the company’s Web site.

Exporting NBS motor mapping data to the iPlan system to select seed areas could remove a key obstacle to the wider clinical application of DT-imaging and tractography, according to a recent clinical study carried out in Germany. Images courtesy of Nexstim.